Tag Archives: VR

WhaT will be the education trends for 2019?

In the Acer for Education magazine of January 2019 some interesting predictions are made for the use of technology in education for the year ahead. Acer is a valued membe of ADESSA, and with their permission, the article is published below:

We may not be able to see the future, but we can make an educated guess on the EdTech trends for the coming year.

I, Robot

In 1951, Isaac Asimov imagined that in 2157, children would no longer go to school, but learn from machines that could teach them lessons and evaluate their homework: that day may be closer than he ever believed. Artificial intelligence is on the riseand the classroom is no stranger to this trend: the growing importance and capabilities of AI will change the learning experience for both students and teachers.

From AI teaching assistants to using data analysis to help pupils focus on the areas in which they are lacking, to the acknowledgement that computational thinking, coding and robotics are a fundamental part of the school curriculum and that coding should be considered a form of literacy, teachers have not been replaced by machines yet and probably will not be for a long time, but both educators and learners can expect to rely more on artificial intelligence in 2019.

The classroom of the future

The impact of EdTech on schools has changed, and will continue to change, the way classrooms look and feel. Interactive whiteboards, projectors, and mobile devices at every student’s disposal, whether assigned by the school or brought from home, are flanking and sometimes replacing the traditional blackboards and chalk we used to associate to the school experience, wi-fi connection in classrooms is more readily available, and EdTech is transforming even the design of the classroom itself, which may become an environment in which everyone is equal, with no ‘front’ from which the teacher can impart knowledge to be accepted without question, an interactive, adaptable ‘smart space’ in which information comes from multiple sources.

Beyond the screen

Using technology in the classroom is no longer limited to students staring at screens. One of the trends we can expect in 2019 is for technology to become even more pervasive and immersive and to take new and more diverse forms: the rise of wearable technology and the Internet of Things means that common objects in our lives, including the ones we use in class, will be augmented and acquire the capability to store and give information, making technology more and more integrated into our daily activities.

It comes as no surprise, then, that with the growing presence of technology in our day to day routines, one of the most hotly anticipated EdTech trends for 2019 is the cheaper and more widespread use of mixed reality, which allow students to interact with their surroundings in new ways and even simulate different environments they would never otherwise reach without stepping out of the classroom. VR sets and digital twins of real-world objects will grant them an immersive, hands-on experience without the difficulties and dangers of interacting with the physical counterparts of the places and things they are shown, and augmented reality will train them for a future in which technology is a part of the fabric of the world.

Learning revolves around students

The changes in students’ learning experience are not just physical: the advancement of EdTech goes beyond the addition of more devices to the classroom and affects education at a deeper level, bringing profound innovations to the way information is given and assimilated. The coming year will see a continuation of the trend of focusing on each individual student’s needsusing technology to provide a personalised path to learning in which content adapts to students and not vice versa: with the aid of EdTech, learning becomes a continuous, multimedia experience that spans many different forms, follows students home if they cannot be present, is interactive and engaging, particularly with the rising popularity of gamification, and most importantly, does not expect everyone to conform to the same educational model that may work well for some students and be damaging to others.

StudentsImproving students’ communication skills,for their future

SANGARI INTRODUCES AUGMENTED AND VITUAL REALITY SOLUTIONS AT TVET COLLEGES CONFERENCE

Sangari Education showcased their Augmented Reality Welding Simulator; CNC Simulator; Automotive Trainers; Educational Virtual Reality solutions; and Electronics Technology Simulations at the 2018 World TVET conference in Cape Town under the theme: Making Technical and Vocational Education Training the First Choice.

Sangari demonstrated the worldwide-acclaimed Soldamatic augmented reality (AR) welding training simulator and a range of virtual reality (VR) educational systems for schools. The Veative educational interactive virtual reality modules cover physics, chemistry, biology, maths, educational tour and language learning.

Bez Sangari, CEO of Sangari Education, explained:

This is an important tool for the classroom. Modules are mapped to the curriculum, delivering a powerful VR solution for schools to engage students with concepts that close the gap between knowledge and understanding.  This technology encourages students to become active learners rather than passive recipients of information. With the varied immersive experiences it offers, virtual reality has huge potential to transform both teaching and learning processes. It is the ultimate medium for delivering what is known as experiential learning.

As an example, students can experience an immersive module on photosynthesis with the help of a controller. They can go into the leaf and get a sense of how plants meet the requirements for photosynthesis. Such ‘look-see-do’ modes encourage students to explore, identify and experiment with the content.

The blue-collar skills shortage in South Africa is estimated at around one million jobs.  To meet this demand, training is essential, but the machinery needed is expensive.  Providing theory and no practical training is insufficient.

To address this, the Soldamatic augmented-reality (AR) welding simulator (winning top honours at the Worlddidac Awards) was demonstrated at the conference. It is a cost-effective alternative to traditional training that provides the same level of skills but offers significant cost saving that can run into millions of rands per annum.  Consumables such as welding rods, steel plates or oxygen are not needed, and because the equipment has no gas emissions, it is eco-friendly.

In addition, the AR simulator can be used in any environment with no need for special clothing or ventilation.  The welding can be done in a classroom or even an office. It is 100% safe, simply because it provides an augmented-reality welding environment, providing augmented-reality 3-D vision through the trainee welder’s headgear.

Sangari Partners with Veative to Bring Complete Virtual Reality Solutions to SA Schools

Continuing its promise to place innovative teaching and learning technologies into schools, Sangari Education has been appointed a distributor for Veative’s educational virtual reality (VR) solutions.

Sangari Education CEO, Bez Sangari, says:

Veative is a VR-focused education company that creates innovative VR curriculums, at an affordable price point, to transform how students learn.  Veative is the first content provider to develop an affordable and practical virtual reality solution for schools. It combines immersive and interactive education modules with plug-and-play virtual-reality headsets and controllers.

The company is a global provider of learning simulations for schools and industries, using technologies such as 3D, virtual reality, augmented reality and mixed reality. Veative’s ever-growing STEM library now covers over 500 modules.

The interactive modules cover physics, chemistry, biology, maths, educational tour and language learning. The kits include portable trolleys to keep headsets charged and safe when not in use while software assists educators with reports and analytics.

This is an important tool for the classroom, which allows focused attention on topics, and is a valuable part of the learning process. With learning modules mapped to the curriculum, we can deliver a powerful VR solution for schools to engage students with concepts, closing the gap between knowledge and understanding.

This technology encourages students to become active learners rather than passive recipients of information. With the varied immersive experiences it offers, virtual reality has huge potential to transform both teaching and learning processes. It is the ultimate medium for delivering what is known as experiential learning.

As an example, students can experience an immersive module on photosynthesis with the help of a controller. They are able to go into the leaf and get a sense of how plants meet the requirements for photosynthesis. Such ‘look-see-do’ modes encourage students to explore, identify and experiment with the content.

Virtual reality also enhances teachers’ capabilities. It makes the job of teaching easier. Within VR simulations, teachers can track student understanding of the topics being taught with analytics and data reporting. As VR encourages active participation, it becomes easy for the teachers to identify possible gaps in the understanding of the students and attend to those issues timeously.

The software allows the teacher to monitor, access and analyse each student’s progress effortlessly, providing instant guidance and feedback. On the other hand, with integrated assessment scores, educators can bridge the learning gap and make learning fun and exciting for students.