17 Reasons why Clevertouch should be your #1 Choice!

  1. First to market with touchscreen tech in 2009
  2. Multi award winning touchscreen manufacturer
  3. Purpose built technology
  4. FREE Software (Lynx Whiteboard, Nuiteq Snowflake, Remote Management, Clevershare, Clevertouch Live)
  5. FREE Training
  6. Free app store (Cleverstore 2.0)
  7. Open platform to support all brands of learner and teacher devices
  8. Share Content to any device
  9. Dual platform for Windows or Android use
  10. Enhanced stylus capabilities
  11. Super Glide Surface
  12. Dual pen/finger mode
  13. Never miss the latest edition of Clevertouch with Over-the-Air updates
  14. 5 year warranty
  15. Smart Personalised Account Profile – NFC (Single Sign on)
  16. Lock settings and monitor your screens to enhance security
  17. Works independently from the network and you can create your own hot spot
Clevertouch 5 August 2021

1st MEDLINE inclusion for AOSIS Books

The AOSIS scholarly book, “Collaborative Capacity Development to Complement Stroke Rehabilitation”, edited by Quinette Louw, has been included in MEDLINE NCBI Bookshelf.

“The acceptance of our E-book, Collaborative Capacity Development to Complement Stroke Rehabilitation marks a remarkable achievement for each co-author and our institution, Stellenbosch University. This book cements the value of rehabilitation in enhancing the lives of people with disabilities due to stroke within an African context. This celebratory moment is the culmination of meaningful partnerships with all contributing authors, the publisher, AOSIS, and financial support from Stellenbosch University.” – Quinette Louw (ed.)

MEDLINE is the primary component of PubMed, a literature database developed and maintained by the NLM National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI). MEDLINE NCBI Bookshelf provides free online access to books and documents in life science and healthcare.

To view the book, click HERE.

Please feel free to visit the AOSIS website and explore more than 70 open access scholarly titles. 

AOSIS August 2021

ADESSA WelcomEs d6 as a New Member

ADESSA is pleased to welcome d6 as the latest company joining the ranks of its members.

d6 logo 2

d6 is a software company that assists schools, businesses, and communities in communicating effectively.

In the schools market, the company’s focus is on simplifying school management for all parties and its products have great features to assist staff and parents in this regard.

d6 also offers advertising space on their communication apps where businesses can promote their products and services to the market; this type of advertising reaches 900 000+ end-users. The mission of d6 is to make a difference and “Simplify Life” for all.

d6 diligent learner

WORKSHOP FOR TEACHERS: PRACTICAL TIPS TO IMPROVE LEARNER DISCIPLINE

This is an interactive workshop about developing strategies to manage learner behaviour. It focusses on positive attitudes and the development of supportive relationships with learners to create a disciplined learning environment. By attending this workshop, you will learn what positive discipline is and the techniques to implement it.

Date: 21 August 2021

Time: 09:00 – 11:00

SACE PD Points: 5

Cost R200

For more information and to register, click HERE.

Macmillan 22 July 2021

Screen accurately for covid symptoms

Only 6.7% of the South African population has received Covid 19 vaccinations, up to date. With the latest political disruptions in the country, the vaccination rollout program has been severely impacted and this in turn will affect the health and wellbeing of every person in this country. Protect your employees and loved ones by accurately screening for COVID-19 symptoms and invest in the Instant Vitals mobile app.  This easy-to-use mobile app uses a unique mix of signal processing and AI technology to measure critical vital signs with medical-grade accuracy. 

Find out more by clicking HERE.

Instant Vitals 14.png

World Youth Skills Day: Unemployment driving unrest in South Africa

Is there a way we can reverse youth unemployment in this country? 

In the midst of South Africa’s deep unrest, 15th July is World Youth Skills Day. Tragically, the country’s youth unemployment rate reached a new record of 32.6%, the highest since the quarterly labour force survey began in 2008, totalling 7.242 million people out of work. Employment lies at the centre of many socio-economic ills, given its capacity to fill time, provide purpose, generate income and drive greater equality. But employment can only be driven by skills training.  

Africa is burdened with an additional challenge: many struggle with literacy, due to the poor delivery of basic education. So, where might hope and inspiration be found in the next decade?

In our pockets.

MySociaLife 1

Smart device costs continue to come down, and new manufacturers are bringing in devices at lower costs, as well as data prices slowly dropping, meaning increasing access as we move through this decade, and more opportunity to upskill via online learning on a phone, with a growing resource of training platforms which offers free training programs like Coursera, Udemy, Udacity and Khan Academy.

But, explains Dean McCoubrey, Founder of MySociaLife, South Africa’s leading digital education and media literacy program, “There are many promises various governments have made about their promise of leadership in the Fourth Industrial Revolution (4IR), but how many understand the foundational digital skills required? You can’t just jump into robotics or coding, you need to understand what it is to be a digital citizen to embrace the free resources of the internet. Without it, you are driving a vehicle without a licence, or a map. How do you explore and grow safely?”

McCoubrey explains that the foundation is required in the same way previous generations were taught at length to hold a pencil and use those words they create more wisely. By contrast, increasingly, the internet is seeing spikes of misinformation and cyberbullying.

“With the basics in place of media literacy – understanding media, its power and influences, and fake news – as well as digital literacy such as privacy, cybersecurity and handling technology carefully, we can shift gear into exploration and expansion. We can find avenues of income. MySociaLife shows teens where they can learn photography for free, for example, and then show them where to sell their photos or videos,” adds McCoubrey.

Teens and pre-teens use the apps and devices so intuitively, and it’s a huge advantage. Some children are poor in school but brilliant online, which means there could be an alternative for young South Africans that could transcend the lack of quality basic education.

“We stand at a doorway to vault over other African countries, but we need guidance to know which keys will open it and prepare GenerationZ for a 4IR future. We need to focus on basic digital education as well before it’s too late and we miss a glaring opportunity.”

Looking at TikTok and other social media and gaming platforms, popular culture has youth fascinated and motivated, with approximately 60% of its 1bn users globally found in the GenZ age range. We already sing, dance, shoot videos and photos, why not build on this, and start to use these skills? What if we taught them how to do it safely, intelligently and with purpose. Minecraft For Education, for example, is a way to game and code at the same time, learning a new “language”.

MySociaLife approaches the challenge by not only teaching kids foundational digital skills but also their teachers and parents on how to direct youth to opportunities and realise potential, while at the same time ensuring online safety too – “two sides of the same coin.” A South African EdTech training platform, it allows schools to simply log in and learn using eight hours of video training for learners aged 8 to 18 including subjects such as online safety, privacy, cybersecurity, digital footprint, bullying and intimidation, fake news, and ways to build skills and generate income online.

The World Economic Forum listed its top 10 skills for “The Future of Work in 2025” and these included technology monitoring, use and control, and also technology design and programming, critical thinking, social influence, reasoning and stress tolerance. “We teach many of these skills to kids in schools and they respond with such energy and enthusiasm. It’s something that ignites them.”

“On World Youth Skills Day, this is a call to the government to understand both the challenges and the opportunities of media and digital literacy – and to accept how much they need to quickly grasp with regard to evolving popular culture, pre-teen and teen usage of devices simply because of the generational divide and technology divide. It could deliver a huge shift in employment, direction and momentum over time. We are completely missing this right now,” says McCoubrey.

“Even kids that are literate and have unlimited access are not fully utilising their devices and media platforms to their full potential. The outcome of digital citizenship is a more aware and responsible society because it reduces the negativity and polarity online, increases people’s ability to choose their next action, embracing the net for what it can offer – to share, to inform, to educate, to deliver income, to support, and much more. It’s apparent we would greatly benefit from this right now,” he concludes.

making education happen